Signs and Symptoms of a Heart Attack

If you notice that you feel out of breath, extremely tired and under the weather, these may be symptoms of a heart attack (aka myocardial infarction). Myocardial infarctions remain the main cause of death for both men and women in the U.S. What Causes a Heart Attack? A myocardial infarction typically occurs when a blood clot forms and blocks the blood flow to the heart. The inability of the blood to reach the heart leads to tissue death: The tissues die because they have been deprived of oxygen. When an individual experiences a myocardial infarction, it is considered a medical emergency and, according to the American Heart Association, every second…

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The Role of Exercise in the Management of Heart Disease

Heart disease is an extremely common illness affecting millions of people around the world. According to the American Heart Association, it’s the leading cause of death in the United States, and affects 1 person every 43 seconds. Despite the fact that this condition is so widespread, however, there is hope: many of the factors contributing to heart disease are lifestyle-related. This means that if you’re affected by this condition, there are plenty of ways you can manage your disease by making healthier lifestyle choices. Perhaps one of the most important things you can do to help manage your disease is to get regular exercise. At Tri-City Cardiology, our board-certified physicians encourage all our patients to stay active. We offer patient education, diagnostic…

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What You Need to Know Heart Disease Among Women

Over the past decade, a major campaign has focused on raising awareness of heart disease in women. However, many women fail to recognize the disease’s symptoms. Rather than hoping for the best, women need to understand their risk and these shocking facts about it. 1. Heart Disease Is the Leading Cause of Death Among Women. Most people associate heart disease with men. However, it was the major factor in the deaths of 25 percent of women in 2013, the most recent year statistics are available, reports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Furthermore, only 54 percent of women are aware of this fact. 2. Most Women Who Die…

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What is the Transradial Cardiac Catheterization?

Interventional cardiologists have used catheterization to diagnose and treat heart conditions for decades.  The traditional procedure involves inserting a catheter into a patient’s femoral artery in the thigh.  A newer approach called transradial cardiac catheterization uses an artery in the wrist and can provide a quicker recovery. Why Cardiologists Use Transradial Cardiac Catheterization Many situations can create a need for this procedure, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine.  It is helpful for individuals experiencing chest pain.  The procedure will tell a cardiologist whether the patient has blocked arteries resulting from coronary artery disease and is useful for creating a treatment plan. Catheterization might be necessary for a known coronary artery blockage…

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All About the Anticoagulation Clinic

Anticoagulation is the use of medications to help prevent blood clots from developing in people who have various medical conditions. These medications must be carefully managed to prevent complications and keep the blood levels of the medications within the desired range. The TriCity Cardiology anticoagulation clinic provides that service. What is Anticoagulation? A number of medical conditions increase the risk of serious complications from blood clots that form in one place in the body, break loose and travel to somewhere else like the brain or lungs. These clots can be life-threatening, so patients are commonly prescribed medications called anticoagulants. They are sometimes called blood thinners, although that is an inaccurate description…

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How Cardiologists Diagnose and Treat an Irregular Heartbeat

Once an individual becomes aware of it, an irregular heartbeat can be a major cause for concern.  Learning about this disorder, also called an arrhythmia, helps reduce stress and makes it easier for patients to navigate the treatment options cardiologists offer. What Exactly is Arrhythmia? It is a disorder that reflects an issue with a heartbeat’s rhythm or rate.  The beat might be irregular, too rapid, or too slow, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  When the heart beats too fast, the condition is tachycardia.  Cardiologists refer to a too-slow beat as bradycardia. A heart’s internal electrical system governs the rate and the rhythm of beats.  Any…

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Understanding Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

Abdominal aortic aneurysms are potentially life-threatening disorders.  When cardiologists see patients with the symptoms of this condition, they order ultrasound scans to confirm a diagnosis.  The appropriate treatment for each patient depends on several factors.  What Are Aortic Aneurysms? In 2014, more than 9,800 U.S. residents died because of an aortic aneurysm, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  This disorder is a bulge that resembles a balloon.  It forms in the aorta, the artery responsible for transporting blood through both the chest and the torso.  A patient with an aortic aneurysm might experience life-threatening blood leakage between split layers of the vessel’s wall.  A rupture occurs when…

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Everything You Need to Know about Atrial Fibrillation

  Everything You Need to Know about Atrial Fibrillation If your doctor recently told you that you have atrial fibrillation, you probably have many questions about the condition. Atrial fibrillation is a type of heart arrhythmia. A doctor might say you have an arrhythmia if your heart beats too quickly, too slowly, or in an irregular way. What Happens to Your Heart during Atrial Fibrillation Blood flows through four chambers of your heart: the left and right atrium chambers at the top and the left and right ventricle chambers at the bottom of your heart. Blood enters your heart through your right atrium, which pumps it to your right ventricle…

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When You Develop Vein Disease

Vein disease – doctors call it venous disease – probably isn’t a subject that receives top-of-the-mind awareness from most people. Once you actually develop the condition, however, information is useful. Here are the basics about vein disease from TriCity Cardiology. Anatomy of a Vein Anatomy plays a major part in vein disease. That’s because – unlike arteries, which are smooth inside – veins have valves. Blood flows readily through your arteries because they have no obstructions and because the blood pressure is higher. As blood gets farther from the heart, the pressure drops. In order to get blood back to the heart, muscle contractions in the legs push it upward,…

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Diagnostic Testing for Heart Disease

The diagnostic testing methods that your doctor uses to test for cardiovascular disease is based on several factors including: Your risk factors Your medical history Your family medical history Your result from procedures and tests A physical exam Types of Diagnotic Testing There is no single definitive test for coronary heart disease. If your doctor thinks you may be suffering from the condition, he may suggest one or some of the following cardiac diagnostic tests: Echocardiography This test, which is also known as an echo, uses sound waves to form a moving image of your heart. Through this, your doctor can see the shape and size of the organ. He…

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