How to Reduce Risk for Vein Disease

Chronic venous insufficiency can lead to chronic vein disease. This is the result of failed valves or stretching of the blood vessels in the extremities. While many of these issues may be painless, some may cause skin irritation, burning and severe pain. In addition, they may contribute to the formation of blood clots or other serious cardiovascular problems. Fortunately, you can reduce your risk for venous insufficiency, reports the Mayo Clinic, by following these five steps. 1. Eating a Healthy Diet Reduces Risk for Vein Disease Obesity and being overweight are major risk factors in developing venous insufficiency. This is due to increased weight and pressure on the veins of…

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Self-management Tips for Patients with Varicose Veins

The first step in deciding what to do about varicose veins is visiting a vein specialist for an assessment of the problem.  For most patients, a combination of professional oversight and home care provides the most effective treatment.  A number of practical tips can help patients self-manage these annoying abnormal blood vessels. Overview of Varicose Veins A varicose vein forms as the result of a faulty one-way valve in a vessel, usually in a leg.  The valve’s malfunction prevents the efficient return of blood to the heart, according to the Vascular Disease Foundation.  As blood pools behind the defective valve, the pressure it creates on the vein causes the vessel’s…

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Heart Disease Clinic Alert: New Study Reveals Increased Mortality

The morbidity of cardiovascular disease, including heart disease, is well-documented. However, researchers conducting a long-term, 25-year study have found morbidity rates much higher than previously thought. As a result, more people may need to have their risk for cardiovascular disease evaluated by a provider at a heart disease clinic, and you need to understand what this new research means for your health. What Does the New Study Say? The study, published by the American College of Cardiology, reports Science Daily, indicates overall morbidity from heart disease is increasing. Although this contrasts with significant declines in morbidity in the western hemisphere, approximately one-third of deaths around the globe are linked to…

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Do You Have Any Risk Factors for an Irregular Heartbeat?

An individual might not attach much importance to an irregular heartbeat, also called an arrhythmia, the first time it occurs.  However, recurring arrhythmias are sometimes frightening.  Knowing the risk factors for developing them can spur many individuals to receive an evaluation and treatment from a cardiologist. Overview of Arrhythmia More than 850,000 U.S. patients become hospitalized for arrhythmia every year, MedicineNet reports.  Although irregular heartbeats are different from abnormal heart rates, the conditions sometimes occur simultaneously. Arrhythmia is a disorder in which electrical impulses that control heartbeats fail to work correctly.  This causes a heart to beat irregularly, too slow, or too fast. There are at least a dozen types…

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How to Prevent Varicose Veins

At Tri-City Cardiology, our team of board-certified physicians and nurse practitioners help people of all ages prevent, treat, and manage cardiovascular-related conditions of all types. One of the most common conditions we get questions about are varicose veins, which is a type of venous disease. While varicose veins typically pose more of a cosmetic issue than a health issue, they can be problematic in severe cases. What Are Varicose Veins? A vein is one of the 3 main types of blood vessels (the other types being arteries and capillaries). In general, veins carry blood back to the heart where it can be oxygenated. Veins contain one-way valves that prevent blood from flowing in the…

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Signs and Symptoms of a Heart Attack

If you notice that you feel out of breath, extremely tired and under the weather, these may be symptoms of a heart attack (aka myocardial infarction). Myocardial infarctions remain the main cause of death for both men and women in the U.S. What Causes a Heart Attack? A myocardial infarction typically occurs when a blood clot forms and blocks the blood flow to the heart. The inability of the blood to reach the heart leads to tissue death: The tissues die because they have been deprived of oxygen. When an individual experiences a myocardial infarction, it is considered a medical emergency and, according to the American Heart Association, every second…

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The Role of Exercise in the Management of Heart Disease

Heart disease is an extremely common illness affecting millions of people around the world. According to the American Heart Association, it’s the leading cause of death in the United States, and affects 1 person every 43 seconds. Despite the fact that this condition is so widespread, however, there is hope: many of the factors contributing to heart disease are lifestyle-related. This means that if you’re affected by this condition, there are plenty of ways you can manage your disease by making healthier lifestyle choices. Perhaps one of the most important things you can do to help manage your disease is to get regular exercise. At Tri-City Cardiology, our board-certified physicians encourage all our patients to stay active. We offer patient education, diagnostic…

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What You Need to Know Heart Disease Among Women

Over the past decade, a major campaign has focused on raising awareness of heart disease in women. However, many women fail to recognize the disease’s symptoms. Rather than hoping for the best, women need to understand their risk and these shocking facts about it. 1. Heart Disease Is the Leading Cause of Death Among Women. Most people associate heart disease with men. However, it was the major factor in the deaths of 25 percent of women in 2013, the most recent year statistics are available, reports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Furthermore, only 54 percent of women are aware of this fact. 2. Most Women Who Die…

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What is the Transradial Cardiac Catheterization?

Interventional cardiologists have used catheterization to diagnose and treat heart conditions for decades.  The traditional procedure involves inserting a catheter into a patient’s femoral artery in the thigh.  A newer approach called transradial cardiac catheterization uses an artery in the wrist and can provide a quicker recovery. Why Cardiologists Use Transradial Cardiac Catheterization Many situations can create a need for this procedure, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine.  It is helpful for individuals experiencing chest pain.  The procedure will tell a cardiologist whether the patient has blocked arteries resulting from coronary artery disease and is useful for creating a treatment plan. Catheterization might be necessary for a known coronary artery blockage…

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All About the Anticoagulation Clinic

Anticoagulation is the use of medications to help prevent blood clots from developing in people who have various medical conditions. These medications must be carefully managed to prevent complications and keep the blood levels of the medications within the desired range. The TriCity Cardiology anticoagulation clinic provides that service. What is Anticoagulation? A number of medical conditions increase the risk of serious complications from blood clots that form in one place in the body, break loose and travel to somewhere else like the brain or lungs. These clots can be life-threatening, so patients are commonly prescribed medications called anticoagulants. They are sometimes called blood thinners, although that is an inaccurate description…

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