Learn the Symptoms of a Silent Heart Attack

  Silent heart attacks don’t involve the typical symptoms, but they can still be life-threatening. Learn how to detect and prevent a silent heart attack.  There’s a lot of misunderstanding about what a heart attack actually feels like. Many people think heart attacks are announced by intense chest pain — but heart attacks are often much sneakier than that. Studies estimate that around 45% of heart attacks are actually “silent” heart attacks.  What is a silent heart attack?  Silent heart attacks aren’t completely unannounced — they just show milder symptoms than the pain associated with a more massive heart attack.  Silent heart attacks can be especially dangerous because they are…

Details

Study Finds Another Heart Health Benefit of Plant Based Diets

A recent study has shown that plant-based diets can reduce your risk of developing cardiovascular disease by altering your gut microbiome. Plant-based diets have long been recommended to patients who have had heart attacks or other heart problems. In recent years, we have started seeing more and more concrete evidence suggesting that plant-based diets truly are beneficial for improving cardiovascular health.  The reason for this seems to lie in the gut microbiome. We’ve known for a long time that your diet can impact the bacteria in your gut. Thanks to a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, we are now learning that those impacts…

Details
heart attack woman

What Do Heart Attacks Feel Like For Women?

  Men and women don’t experience the same heart attack symptoms. Because women’s symptoms are more subtle, being familiar with them could save a life. Quickly recognizing the symptoms of a heart attack can be the difference between life and death. Unfortunately, most people think that heart attack symptoms such as sudden pain in the chest, shortness of breath, and inability to walk and stand are the only heart attack symptoms.  In reality, these well-known symptoms usually only occur in men. Women’s heart attack symptoms tend to be much more subtle, and they’re far less known. Knowing what to watch out for can help you act quickly if a heart…

Details
Senior woman jogging on track wearing pink shirt

Marathon Training May Be Able to Cut Years Off Your Cardiovascular Age

A recent study has found that training for a marathon can undo some of the cardiovascular effects of aging. As we age, time gradually takes its toll on the body. Many of us develop the need for reading glasses, our joints feel achier, and our memory maybe is not as sharp as it once was.  Aging also naturally affects the heart, causing what’s known as aortic stiffness, or a hardening of the arteries and blood vessels that can lead to higher blood pressure and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease — even for people who are otherwise in good health. Aortic stiffness has been linked to a number of health…

Details
young woman in front of fridge at night

Evening Eating May Cause Worsened Heart Health

It’s not just what you eat — it’s when. A new study suggests consuming meals late at night may harm our cardiovascular health. Is eating later in the evening dangerous to your heart? A new study concludes that when we consume most of our calories can be just as harmful to our cardiovascular health as what we eat. The report, presented at a recent American Heart Association conference, analyzed the eating patterns of 112 women who recorded what they ate and when for the first week of the study and one week 12 months after the study began. After reviewing the participants’ food diaries, researchers noted that women who took…

Details
happy black family preparing for the holidays

Tips for a Heart Healthy Holiday

The holidays are a time for food, family, and fun — but don’t forget your heart health! Try these tips to have a heart-healthy holiday.The holidays are a time for food, family, and fun — but don’t forget your heart health! Try these tips to have a heart-healthy holiday. The holiday season is full of baking, gifting and, unfortunately, visits to the emergency room. Year after year, New York City ER doctors see a ten percent uptick in patients during the holidays. Why? All of the merriment that comes with Thanksgiving and Christmas brings light-hanging disasters, kitchen accidents, and eggnog-induced falls. Heart disease risk factors, in particular, skyrocket during the…

Details
woman and dog shaking hands silhouette

Could Man’s Best Friend Improve Your Heart Health?

New studies reveal that adopting a dog can improve your heart health. Here’s what we know. For years, dogs have been man’s best friend. Our furry companions offer unconditional love, reduce our stress, and, according to two recently published studies, they might also have a positive impact on our heart health.   The studies from the Mayo Clinic and Circulation — published in August and October, respectively — reveal that dog owners live longer and fare better after a heart attack or stroke than do individuals who don’t own a canine friend or live with a spouse or children. In fact, some findings reveal that dog owners are 33 percent less…

Details
woman checking her heart rate on smartwatch

What Does Your Heart Rate Say About Your Health?

Your heart rate provides a window into your cardiovascular fitness.  Do you know your resting heart rate (RHR)? If you don’t, you should. This number, a tally of how many times your heart beats per minute, is a leading indicator of your cardiovascular health. RHR measures your pulse while you’re at rest. During the day, your heart rate adapts to your changing physical activity levels. While you exercise, for instance, your heart fuels your body with more oxygen. When you’re sitting still, you need less oxygen and your heart rate slows. Your RHR provides a rough picture of your heart health. If your RHR is higher than average, you may…

Details

Heart Problems in Young Athletes

Though it’s very rare, it’s not unheard of for young athletes to unexpectedly die of heart conditions. Here’s what to know and how to prevent this tragedy. It’s very rare for young athletes to die from unexpected heart complications — but in exceptional cases, it does happen. For parents of young athletes, these headline-making stories can be a source of alarm. But there’s hardly reason for panic if you’re knowledgeable about the symptoms that these unusual cardiac disorders might present, and how to properly spot the difference between normal athlete’s heart and a more serious condition.  Athlete’s heart — is it dangerous?  Parents of young athletes might have heard of…

Details

Understanding Peripheral Vascular Disease

Peripheral vascular disease refers to narrowed arteries in the leg due to a build-up of fatty deposits. A potentially serious condition, PVD can be successfully treated with lifestyle changes. Peripheral vascular disease (PVD), also known as peripheral artery disease, refers to a build-up of fatty deposits in the arteries outside of the heart or brain. According to the CDC, the condition affects about 8.5 million people in the U.S., between 12 and 20 percent of whom are over the age of 60.  Most often, PVD appears in the legs, where a narrowing of the arteries restricts blood flow to the limbs. As a result, patients with PVD feel pain in…

Details