woman checking her heart rate on smartwatch

What Does Your Heart Rate Say About Your Health?

Your heart rate provides a window into your cardiovascular fitness.  Do you know your resting heart rate (RHR)? If you don’t, you should. This number, a tally of how many times your heart beats per minute, is a leading indicator of your cardiovascular health. RHR measures your pulse while you’re at rest. During the day, your heart rate adapts to your changing physical activity levels. While you exercise, for instance, your heart fuels your body with more oxygen. When you’re sitting still, you need less oxygen and your heart rate slows. Your RHR provides a rough picture of your heart health. If your RHR is higher than average, you may…

Details

Heart Problems in Young Athletes

Though it’s very rare, it’s not unheard of for young athletes to unexpectedly die of heart conditions. Here’s what to know and how to prevent this tragedy. It’s very rare for young athletes to die from unexpected heart complications — but in exceptional cases, it does happen. For parents of young athletes, these headline-making stories can be a source of alarm. But there’s hardly reason for panic if you’re knowledgeable about the symptoms that these unusual cardiac disorders might present, and how to properly spot the difference between normal athlete’s heart and a more serious condition.  Athlete’s heart — is it dangerous?  Parents of young athletes might have heard of…

Details

Understanding Peripheral Vascular Disease

Peripheral vascular disease refers to narrowed arteries in the leg due to a build-up of fatty deposits. A potentially serious condition, PVD can be successfully treated with lifestyle changes. Peripheral vascular disease (PVD), also known as peripheral artery disease, refers to a build-up of fatty deposits in the arteries outside of the heart or brain. According to the CDC, the condition affects about 8.5 million people in the U.S., between 12 and 20 percent of whom are over the age of 60.  Most often, PVD appears in the legs, where a narrowing of the arteries restricts blood flow to the limbs. As a result, patients with PVD feel pain in…

Details

How Can I Prevent Heart Disease?

Although heart disease is serious, it’s also very preventable if you’re willing to practice some healthy habits. Keeping our hearts strong is the key to a long, healthy life, and the dangers of failing to do so are very real. In 2015 and 2016 — the most recent years for which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have published mortality rates — heart disease accounted for 23% of all deaths, topping both cancer and accidents. Fortunately, heart disease, heart failure, heart attacks, and strokes are all preventable. In fact, it’s estimated that around 80% of cardiovascular ailments can be avoided by adopting a heart-healthy lifestyle and regularly monitoring important…

Details

How Do You Choose a Cardiologist?

Choosing a cardiologist isn’t a decision to be taken lightly. Here’s what to consider if you believe you need to see a heart health specialist. Whether you have a serious heart condition or are just looking to visit a cardiologist as a precautionary measure, it’s important that you find a cardiologist that’s a good fit for you. It can be nerve-wracking to talk about your heart health, and you want to know you’re in good hands. If you’re thinking about seeking out a heart care specialist, you’re already on the right track to taking good care of your cardiac health. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that 25…

Details

Am I at Risk of Serious Heart Disease?

Am I at Risk of Serious Heart Disease? Heart attacks are a leading cause of death in the U.S. Fortunately, the top three risk factors are ones you can control. Each year, one in four Americans dies from a heart attack, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Some risk factors for heart disease are outside of our control — it tends to run in families and certain ethnic groups, for instance, such as African Americans, Mexican Americans, and Native Americans. Its prevalence also increases with age, and heart attacks tend to affect more men than women. Yet several of the major causes of heart disease can…

Details

Does Heat Affect My Cardiovascular Disease?

Does Heat Affect My Cardiovascular Disease? Rising temperatures put patients with heart conditions at risk. Here’s how to stay safe this summer. There’s nothing quite like spending a sunny summer day outside with friends and family. But as we approach the summer season in Arizona, temperatures are about to spike. The Scottsdale area reached a scorching 108°F last June, and saw an even hotter July. While these extreme temperatures can cause anyone discomfort, they pose a real danger to individuals with heart conditions. When we’re in a hot environment, our hearts pump extra blood to the skin — up to four times more than normal — to activate our sweat…

Details

What Does a Mini Heart Attack Feel Like?

What Does a Mini Heart Attack Feel Like? According to Harvard Health, in approximately 50 percent of all myocardial infarctions (i.e., heart attacks), the sufferer believes the symptoms being experienced are caused by a less serious problem, which can increase the individual’s risk of dying from coronary heart disease (CHD), aka coronary artery disease (CAD). While there are several types of heart attacks, the mini heart attack or ‘silent’ heart attack, accounts for 45 percent of those suffered. A mini heart attack occurs when there is a temporary blockage in the coronary arteries. Just as with mini stroke symptoms, the symptoms experienced during a mini heart attack may be extremely…

Details

Can Sudden Cardiac Death be Prevented?

What Causes a Heart Attack? By knowing the symptoms associated with a heart attack and seeking emergency assistance right away, sudden cardiac death can be prevented. Since approximately 50 percent of the people who die of cardiac arrest do so within an hour of the onset of symptoms, seeking medical assistance immediately is the key to survival. Cardiac arrests are frequently the result of coronary artery disease (CAD), aka coronary heart disease (CHD). This event occurs when there is a sudden blockage in the blood flow to the heart. This blockage deprives the heart of oxygen. Without emergency treatment, the heart muscle is unable to pump and starts to die.…

Details

Can You Take a Bath After Sclerotherapy?

Can You Take a Bath After Sclerotherapy? An outpatient vein treatment frequently used to address varicose veins and spider veins is called sclerotherapy. During this procedure, a vein specialist uses a very fine needle to slowly inject a solution into the affected vein, causing it to close off. Once the affected vein collapses, the blood reroutes to healthier veins. As time passes, the body reabsorbs the treated vein. Directly following your sclerotherapy treatment, you should avoid hot baths, hot showers, hot tubs, hot compresses, whirlpools and saunas for at least a few days because the heat emitted during these activities causes the veins to dilate (enlarge). What to Expect as…

Details