How Cardiologists Diagnose and Treat an Irregular Heartbeat

Once an individual becomes aware of it, an irregular heartbeat can be a major cause for concern.  Learning about this disorder, also called an arrhythmia, helps reduce stress and makes it easier for patients to navigate the treatment options cardiologists offer. What Exactly is Arrhythmia? It is a disorder that reflects an issue with a heartbeat’s rhythm or rate.  The beat might be irregular, too rapid, or too slow, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  When the heart beats too fast, the condition is tachycardia.  Cardiologists refer to a too-slow beat as bradycardia. A heart’s internal electrical system governs the rate and the rhythm of beats.  Any…

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Understanding Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

Abdominal aortic aneurysms are potentially life-threatening disorders.  When cardiologists see patients with the symptoms of this condition, they order ultrasound scans to confirm a diagnosis.  The appropriate treatment for each patient depends on several factors.  What Are Aortic Aneurysms? In 2014, more than 9,800 U.S. residents died because of an aortic aneurysm, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  This disorder is a bulge that resembles a balloon.  It forms in the aorta, the artery responsible for transporting blood through both the chest and the torso.  A patient with an aortic aneurysm might experience life-threatening blood leakage between split layers of the vessel’s wall.  A rupture occurs when…

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Everything You Need to Know about Atrial Fibrillation

  Everything You Need to Know about Atrial Fibrillation If your doctor recently told you that you have atrial fibrillation, you probably have many questions about the condition. Atrial fibrillation is a type of heart arrhythmia. A doctor might say you have an arrhythmia if your heart beats too quickly, too slowly, or in an irregular way. What Happens to Your Heart during Atrial Fibrillation Blood flows through four chambers of your heart: the left and right atrium chambers at the top and the left and right ventricle chambers at the bottom of your heart. Blood enters your heart through your right atrium, which pumps it to your right ventricle…

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When You Develop Vein Disease

Vein disease – doctors call it venous disease – probably isn’t a subject that receives top-of-the-mind awareness from most people. Once you actually develop the condition, however, information is useful. Here are the basics about vein disease from TriCity Cardiology. Anatomy of a Vein Anatomy plays a major part in vein disease. That’s because – unlike arteries, which are smooth inside – veins have valves. Blood flows readily through your arteries because they have no obstructions and because the blood pressure is higher. As blood gets farther from the heart, the pressure drops. In order to get blood back to the heart, muscle contractions in the legs push it upward,…

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Diagnostic Testing for Heart Disease

The diagnostic testing methods that your doctor uses to test for cardiovascular disease is based on several factors including: Your risk factors Your medical history Your family medical history Your result from procedures and tests A physical exam Types of Diagnotic Testing There is no single definitive test for coronary heart disease. If your doctor thinks you may be suffering from the condition, he may suggest one or some of the following cardiac diagnostic tests: Echocardiography This test, which is also known as an echo, uses sound waves to form a moving image of your heart. Through this, your doctor can see the shape and size of the organ. He…

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How is Atrial Fibrillation Treated?

The treatment you receive for atrial fibrillation (AF or AFib) is generally dependent on how long you’ve had the condition and how severe it is. Doctors also need to take into account the underlying cause of your atrial fibrillation and how bothersome your symptoms are. Treatment Goals for AFib There are three main goals in terms of AFib treatment, these are to: Prevent blood clots. Control the rate. Reset the rhythm. Treating AFib The strategy you and your doctor choose is dependent on factors like whether you’re able to take medications to control your heart rhythm and whether you have any other heart problems. In some cases of AF, you may…

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How is Heart Failure Treated?

For a patient with heart failure, time is of the essence. Early diagnosis and treatment is crucial in terms of helping you live a full and active life. Specific treatments for this heart-related condition are dependent on the severity and type of the condition you have. Treatment for Heart Failure There are several ways to treat heart failure depending on the severity of your condition, and more than one way might be needed. Lifestyle Changes If you’ve suffered from heart failure, your doctor may recommend the following: Eating healthily Losing weight Exercising regularly Quitting smoking Medicines Depending on the type of heart failure you’ve suffered, the severity and your response…

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Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Varicose Veins

Humans have been dealing with varicose veins for thousands of years. Even the ancient Greeks used compression bandages as a varicose vein treatment. In the world of cell phones and computers, that’s still an acceptable management strategy, but doctors also have more modern techniques. Here’s what you should know about varicose veins, courtesy of in Mesa, Arizona. What Are Varicose Veins? With each heartbeat, blood flows through the blood vessels in the body. Arteries take blood out to the tissues, through vascular beds of tiny blood vessels called capillaries, then veins return the blood to the heart for another circuit. Unlike arteries – which are smooth – veins have tiny…

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How Cardiologists Treat Heart Failure

Despite advances in treating heart disease, the number of U.S. deaths from heart failure is increasing.  Understanding the treatment options is important for patients newly diagnosed with this cardiac problem. Overview of Heart Failure According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 5.7 million American adults suffer from this condition.  Within five years after receiving their diagnosis, around 50 percent of them die. The National Center for Health Statistics reports that the rate of deaths linked to heart failures dropped from the 2000 rate of 103.1 per 100,000 to 89.5 nine years later.  However, in 2014, it rose to 96.9. In patients with this condition, the heart…

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Vein Disease: The Basics

If you’re like most people, you probably give little thought to your veins. Develop vein disease, however, and your veins may come front and center into your consciousness. Here’s what you should know about vein disease, courtesy of , in Mesa, Arizona. Veins Have Valves When your heart beats, blood travels through the arteries. In the veins, however, leg movement is what helps the blood get back to the heart. Inside each vein are tiny flaps of skin called valves. These valves close when the heart is not contracting, which prevents blood from pooling in the veins. Vein disease often results when the veins don’t work properly. Vein Disease: Valve…

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