Risk Factors for Varicose Veins

Varicose veins are one of the most common vascular problems in the US. According to a study published in Circulation, around 22 million women and 11 million men suffer from the condition. A number of factors can increase your risk for developing varicose veins. Some of those factors are things you can control, others are not. Common Varicose Veins Risk Factors Age and Gender More women than men have vein problems and gender does play a role in determining your risk for varicose or spider veins. One of the factors increases women’s risk for developing the veins is changes in hormone levels throughout life. Fluctuating estrogen and progesterone levels cause changes to…

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What Are the Causes and Symptoms of Varicose Veins?

Bulging, discolored blood vessels sometimes affect more than self-confidence.  For many individuals, they result in considerable discomfort.  Understanding the causes and symptoms of varicose veins can help reduce the stress of patients considering treatment for these abnormal blood vessels. Varicose Vein Overview For most individuals, varicose veins are a cosmetic issue.  However, these gnarled blood vessels can also cause pain.  Around 60 percent of Americans suffer from them, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Varicose veins have a characteristic ropelike appearance.  They appear blue or purple beneath the skin.  While some physicians consider varicose and spider veins types of the same condition, others treat them as separate disorders. …

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Understanding a Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)

A deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a potential emergency.  It can result in a loose blood clot that eventually blocks blood flow, causing a pulmonary embolism.  Interventional cardiologists are physicians specially trained to treat this condition. Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Overview The primary areas where deep vein thromboses develop are the thigh and the lower leg, according to MedlinePlus.  However, DVTs can arise in deep veins in other parts of the body, such as an arm or the pelvis. DVTs most frequently develop in individuals who are at least 60 years old.  Once a blood clot has broken free and begun moving through a patient’s bloodstream, it is known as…

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The Connection Between Varicose Veins and Pregnancy

Women are more likely than men to develop varicose veins. According to the Office on Women’s Health, up to 55 percent of women in the US experience some type of vein problem at some point in their lifetime, compared to up to 45 percent of men. Pregnancy can play a contributing role in the development of varicose veins. Understanding how varicose veins and pregnancy are related can help you learn what to do to minimize the veins or to treat them if needed. All About Varicose Veins and Pregnancy Why Pregnancy Increases the Risk for Varicose Veins Varicose veins are more likely to develop during pregnancy for two reasons. For…

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Tri-City Cardiology Honored as Top Referrer to Arizona Smoker’s Helpline

Tri-City Cardiology has been honored as the top referring medical practice to the Arizona Smoker’s Helpline (ASHLine) for the past few years by the Maricopa County Department of Public Health.  Since receiving training in 2014, the five East Valley Tri-City Cardiology locations have referred over 560 patients to ASHLine for help to quit tobacco usage. Tri-City Cardiology utilized the data from the American College of Cardiology PINNACLE Data Registry on smoking cessation and intervention clinical quality measures to identify an opportunity for improvement in this quality metric.  They reached out to ASHLine to assist them in setting up a referral process to help their patients with smoking cessation.  This relationship…

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Tips From a Vein Doctor on Preventing Varicose Veins

Varicose veins often create more than cosmetic issues.  They can result in a number of medical complications and cause discomfort so severe that it disrupts normal daily activities.  There is no surefire way to prevent these troublesome vessels.  However, understanding how they form and taking advantage of suggestions from a vein doctor can help keep new veins from developing. Why Varicose Veins Form As many as 25 million adults in the United States have varicose veins, according to Cedars-Sinai®.  A majority of them are women. Many factors contribute to the likelihood that an individual will develop this problem.  However, its actual cause is the presence of leaky one-way valves in…

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Vascular Disease and Your Circulatory System

Vascular Disease and Your Circulatory System Did you know there are more than 60,000 miles of blood vessels in your body? It’s true! The National Institute on Aging also says that 1,800 gallons of blood flow through the vast network of arteries, veins and capillaries of your cardiovascular system. These blood vessels, known collectively as your vascular system, circulate the blood your body cells rely on for survival. Vascular disease is any abnormal condition of your blood vessels that affects your circulatory system. Vein doctors treat vascular disease. About Your Vascular System The word ‘vascular’ comes from the Latin word vasculum, which means ‘small vessel.’ Your vascular system carries blood…

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Modern Treatments for Varicose Veins

Varicose veins have been around for a long time; the writings of Hippocrates (the “father of modern medicine”) include strategies like wrapping tight bandages around the legs to treat this condition. Tri-City Cardiology Consultants still uses this technique, but we also have a lot more modern strategies for treating varicose veins. All About Varicose Veins With each heartbeat, blood flows through the body into arteries, which carry blood to the body tissues. On the return journey, the blood flows through veins. Since the force of the blood flow is lower on the return journey, tiny flaps of tissue called valves help prevent it from flowing backwards between heartbeats. When the…

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So You’ve Got Peripheral Vascular Disease

PVD, PAD — sounds like alphabet soup. Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) and peripheral artery disease (PAD) are terms used for what is essentially the same condition: diseases of the blood vessels outside of the heart and brain. If you have PVD or PAD, it’s important to understand how you can help yourself and when you need the attention of one of the cardiologists or vascular surgeons at Tri-City Cardiology Consultants. What Is Peripheral Vascular Disease? Peripheral vascular disease is probably the most accurate name for these conditions, as both arteries and veins are affected. PAD is a specific condition in which the arteries are narrowed or blocked by plaque, a…

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Ways to Reduce Your Risk for Vein Disease

Ways to Reduce Your Risk for Vein Disease Did you know that about half of all people in the United States have vein disease, according to the Society of Interventional Radiology? Arteries carry oxygen-rich blood moving from your heart to the rest of your body and veins hold the oxygen-poor blood that is moving back towards your heart. The veins in your legs have a tough job because they have to move blood upwards, against the force of gravity. Special one-way flaps, known as valves, help control blood flow inside your veins. These valves open when you move your leg muscles to allow more blood to flow to these muscles.…

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